Further Writing Guidelines

Presentation Format Coursework should be word-processed using Verdana font, point size 10, and double-spaced. You should be aware of the need to keep back-ups of your work, and to plan for delays and times when computers are greatly in demand if you are relying on University computing facilities. Computer failure and/or lack of backed-up work will not normally be accepted…

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Errors and penalties to avoid

Some of the more common errors to be found in students’ coursework are given below. All will detract from your performance, and can be avoided if you take time to think about what you are doing. Misreading the question This may sound obvious but can easily be done when you are working under pressure. Ensure you have checked the number…

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Punctuation marks in sentences including subordination and co-ordination

Like a compound sentence, a compound sentence including subordination may have a comma, a semicolon, a colon, or a dash between the independent clauses, which may be linked by a conjunction as well. The punctuation of the subordinate clauses and their ways of connection with the principal clauses depend on the types of the subordinate clauses. Compound sentences with subordination…

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Punctuation mark in the complex sentence

A subject clause, like the subject of a simple sentence, is not divided by any punctuation mark from the rest of the sentence, being closely connected with it, since this clause is the subject of the whole complex sentence, and only a brief pause is needed. Neither the place of such clause in the sentence, nor the way of its…

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Punctuation marks in the compound sentence

The independent clauses of a compound sentence joined asyndetically are divided by a comma to denote a brief pause, falling tone, and often enumeration of closely connected actions. The copulative conjunction ‘and’ might be inserted between the clauses: “One hand went to the heart, the other outstretched toward the flag”. In case of a longer pause and weaker connection, to…

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Punctuation marks for independent elements

An interjection is usually followed by an exclamation mark to denote great emotion: pain, anger, astonishment, acute distress, joy or delight; or several of these feelings combined. In case of several interjections, there is usually an exclamation mark after each. There may be a dash between two interjections. For example: “Hi! stop a minute, will you?” In case of an…

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